Faith communities

Communities of faith across the world grapple with life’s most meaningful and challenging, questions together. Conversations within or among those communities can leave little room for curiosity or doubt.

We work alongside communities of faith to explore their differences with compassion and dignity, preserving community and sustaining relationships. Whether discord stems from issues such as climate change, scripture, or policy and leadership, dialogue create space for people to come together in new ways.

 

The Challenge The Lexington Interfaith Clergy Association (LICA) is a unique and productive organization. LICA is made up leaders from different faith communities in Lexington, Massachusetts, including Catholics, Protestants, Hindus, Jews, Muslims,...
A group of conservative Christian pastors uncovered ways to be curious about science and the natural world.
The Anglican Communion's profound disagreements around homosexuality came to a boiling point. Leadership turned to dialogue to enhance mutual understanding.

Select client list

  • Anglican Communion
  • BioLogos Foundation
  • Episcopal Church of the United States
  • Episcopal House of Bishops
  • Glendale Presbyterian
  • Interfaith Mediation Centre, Nigeria
  • Jewish Dialogue Group
  • Lexington Interfaith Clergy Association
  • Minnesota Council of Churches
  • Temple Emanuel
  • Temple Shalom
  • Worcester County Ecumenical Council
  • Workmen's Circle
  • There should be opportunities throughout the [Anglican] Communion for ongoing structured conversations regarding difficult issues. These should engage persons at all levels within and between Provinces and should be guided by agreed covenants similar to those that have assisted our conversations.

    Anglican Community & Human Sexuality retreat participant
  • I cannot possibly walk out of this experience and help being a different person. I feel that my own experience has been life-changing.

    Glendale Presbyterian Church member
  • Through this training, we will have more people in the stream of work that we do and become better equipped with the know-how, skills and techniques. But most important, together we will sow a seed that will germinate and become a source of the antidote to terrorism, fanaticism, bigotry and extremism.

    Imam Sani Isah
  • One of the best conversations I had this year was at a course for pastors on Science and Faith funded by BioLogos and hosted by Gordon College. Here safe space was created for pastors and church leaders to wrestle with topics like evolution which are all too often “off limits” or believed to be antagonistic to the faith. I had the honor of sharing my own work on the science of sex difference and was met with thoughtful engagement as we wrestled together with biology, neuroscience, and Biblical interpretation.

    There is a need not only for safe space within our churches but for our church leaders who often feel alone, or who may feel their job could be at risk if they engage in controversial conversations. How are they to make safe spaces in their own congregations for healthy dialogue if they rarely experience safe space to do the same? 

    Megan DeFranza, Gordon College
  • There should be opportunities throughout the [Anglican] Communion for ongoing structured conversations regarding difficult issues. These should engage persons at all levels within and between Provinces and should be guided by agreed covenants similar to those that have assisted our conversations.

    Anglican Community & Human Sexuality retreat participant
  • I now lead teams with a different language, using different processes, and with a different awareness of team dynamics. [I’ve seen] relationships grow and deepen, unity and commitment remain high, and mutual respect established and fostered.

    Lauren Cobb, member of Glendale Presbyterian Church Task Force
  • [Public Conversations'] responses changed my perception. This comes only with sincerity and speaking from the heart.

    Project Partner, Interfaith Mediation Centre
  • I am amazed at what came out - the way people shared their stories. This is not like a role-play; it really touched me.

    Seth Karamage, Interfaith Mediation Centre